We Are

MOVERS & SHAKERS

None but ourselves can free our minds.

- Bob Marley

#PeaceByExample

 

THE MESSAGE

My message is peace.
To go beyond survival,

for all of us to get  
 beyond survival and to live in this world 
   with peace in our hearts, our souls, 
 and for each other.
    It starts from within and the most 
   difficult task we face is to face ourselves;  

however long it takes and 
  however deep we need to go…
 stop fighting it. 
    Be without fear, indulge your soul 
  and weather the storms, the demons, the pain. 
    Trust and you will endure.
   For all has purpose, Great Purpose,
   if you believe.

- Julie Eppich 2003

BE THE EXAMPLE.

BE THE CHANGE.

BE THE PEACE.

 
March For Our Lives
March For Our Lives

The March for Our Lives was a student-led demonstration in support of legislation to prevent gun violence in the United States. It took place in Washington, D.C., on March 24, 2018, with over 880 sibling events throughout the United States and around the world, and was planned by Never Again MSD in collaboration with the nonprofit organization. The event followed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting a month earlier.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Cleaning The Beach
Cleaning The Beach
press to zoom
Bob Marley
Bob Marley

Robert Nesta "Bob" Marley was a Jamaican singer-songwriter, musician and guitarist who achieved international fame and acclaim, blending mostly reggae, ska and rocksteady in his compositions. Starting out in 1963 with the group the Wailers, he forged a distinctive songwriting and vocal style that would later resonate with audiences worldwide. He was a committed Rastafari who infused his music with a sense of spirituality.

press to zoom
Singing Revolution
Singing Revolution

Music and social activism have long been “partners in [nonviolent] crime.” During the Singing Revolution, Estonia literally sang its way out of the rule under the Soviet Union. In 1988, more than 100,000 Estonians gathered for five nights to protest Soviet rule. This was known as the Singing Revolution. In 1991, after decades of Soviet rule, a country with just 1.5 million people regained it’s independence.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was an African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writings. Northerners at the time found it hard to believe that such a great orator had once been a slave.

press to zoom
Cesar Chavez
Cesar Chavez

Cesar Chavez advocated for peaceful boycotts, protest, and a grueling yet nonviolent 25-day hunger strike which led to legislative changes to end exploitative abuse of America’s farm workers in the late 1960s. He led a five-year strike in Delano, Calif., bringing together over 2,000 farmers to demand minimum wage primarily for underpaid overworked Filipino farmworkers. This peaceful protest helped secure unions, better wages and security for farmworkers.

press to zoom
press to zoom
press to zoom
Kiev 2014
Kiev 2014

The pianist, photographed by Facebook user Anastasiia Bereza, reportedly set up his piano in front of the armed police the day after protesters in Kiev brought down a statue of Lenin.

press to zoom
Women's March
Women's March

The Women's March was a worldwide protest on January 21, 2017, to advocate legislation and policies regarding human rights and other issues, including women's rights, immigration reform, healthcare reform, reproductive rights, the natural environment, LGBTQ rights, racial equality, freedom of religion, and workers' rights.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Fists In The Air
Fists In The Air

African-American track athletes Tommie Smith (first place) and John Carlos (third place) used their wins in Mexico City's 1968 Olympic Games to show their opposition to the continued oppression of blacks in the U.S. They stood in black socks to represent black poverty; Carlos wore beads to symbolize black lynchings. The silver medalist on the podium, Australian Peter Norman, wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge on his track suit in solidarity.

press to zoom
Justice
Justice
press to zoom
Reaching Out Together
Reaching Out Together
press to zoom
Ruby Bridges
Ruby Bridges

In 1960, when she was six years old, her parents responded to a request from the NAACP and volunteered her to participate in the integration of the New Orleans school system. Bridges and her mother were escorted to school by four federal marshals during the first year Bridges attended William Frantz Elementary. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which she formed in 1999 to promote "the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences".

press to zoom
press to zoom
Flint Sit In
Flint Sit In

The United Auto Workers, formed in 1935, had a lot to fight for. During the Depression, General Motors executives started shifting work loads to plants with non-union members, crippling the UAW. So in December 1936, workers held a sit-in at the Fisher Body Plant in Flint, Michigan. Within two weeks, about 135,000 men were striking in 35 cities across the nation.

press to zoom
Greta Thunberg
Greta Thunberg

Greta Thunberg is a Swedish environmental activist who has gained international recognition for promoting the view that humanity is facing an existential crisis arising from climate change. Thunberg is known for her youth and her straightforward speaking manner, both in public and to political leaders and assemblies, in which she criticizes world leaders for their failure to take sufficient action to address the climate crisis.

press to zoom
Colin Kaepernick
Colin Kaepernick

At age 29,Colin Kaepernick, a former NFL quarterback was the first to kneel during the National Anthem to peacefully protest racial injustice. "This stand wasn’t for me,’’ he said. “This is because I’m seeing things happen to people that don’t have a voice, people that don’t have a platform to talk and have their voices heard, and effect change.’’ Retired Army Green Beret Nate Boyer is the man who first convinced Kaepernick to kneel during the National Anthem as a means for peaceful protest.

press to zoom
Inez Milholland
Inez Milholland

As one of the four mounted heralds of the Suffrage Parade on March 3, 1913, lawyer Inez Milholland Boissevain led a procession of more than 5,000 marchers down Washington D.C.'s Pennsylvania Avenue. The National American Woman Suffrage Association raised more than $14,000 to fund the event that became one of the most important moments in the struggle to grant women the right to vote — a right that was finally achieved seven years later.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Syrian Refugee Crisis
Syrian Refugee Crisis

Syrian refugee Rami Basisah plays his violin on the Greece-Macedonia border. The 24-year-old, who fled the devastated city of Homs, performed Beethoven's Ode to Joy and Vivaldi's For Seasons, among other pieces. Picture: Jure Erzen

press to zoom
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau, the Harvard-educated 19th-century philosopher and poet, remains a major symbol of peaceful resistance because of his 1849 work, "Civil Disobedience," in which he questions why people would obey a government whose laws they believe to be unjust. On account of his opposition to slavery, Thoreau refused to pay taxes, an act that briefly landed him in jail in 1846 (a relative bailed him out).

press to zoom
press to zoom
#peacebyexample
#peacebyexample
press to zoom
Vandana Shiva
Vandana Shiva

Vandana Shiva is an Indian physicist and social activist. Shiva founded the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy (RFSTN), an organization devoted to developing sustainable methods of agriculture, in 1982. Vandana Shiva has spent much of her life in the defense and celebration of biodiversity and indigenous knowledge. She has worked to promote biodiversity in agriculture to increase productivity, nutrition, farmer's incomes.

press to zoom
Heather Heyer
Heather Heyer

Heather Heyer died when a car rammed into a group of people peacefully protesting against a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Heather, a 32-year-old legal assistant with a law firm in Virginia, repeatedly championed civil rights issues on social media.

press to zoom
Greensboro Sit In
Greensboro Sit In

On Feb. 1, 1960 four black freshmen at North Carolina A&T State University, Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil, Ezell Blair, Jr., and David Richmond, took seats at the segregated lunch counter of F. W. Woolworth's in Greensboro, N.C. They were refused service and sat peacefully until the store closed. The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960, which led to the Woolworth department store chain removing its policy of racial segregation.

press to zoom
Robert Kennedy
Robert Kennedy

Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy was an American politician and lawyer from Massachusetts. He served as the United States junior senator from New York from January 1965 until his assassination in June 1968. Kennedy had always remained committed to civil rights enforcement to such a degree that he commented in 1962 that it seemed to envelop almost every area of his public and private life.

press to zoom
Standing Rock Sioux
Standing Rock Sioux

The Standing Rock Indian Reservation is located in North Dakota and South Dakota in the United States. On April 1, 2016, LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, an elder member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, and her grandchildren established the Sacred Stone Camp to protest the DAPL, which they said threatens the upper Missouri River, the only water supply for the Standing Rock Reservation. The activists argued that the pipeline would jeopardize the water source of the reservation, the Missouri River

press to zoom
Rebecca Lolosoli
Rebecca Lolosoli

Rebecca Lolosoli is the matriarch of Umoja Village, an all women’s community located in the Samburu District of Kenya. She founded the village in 1991 to support women and girls, orphans and widows – those who were facing social and economic difficulties and had been abandoned by their families, or were fleeing domestic violence and/or forced marriage.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs

press to zoom
Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter
Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter

The Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project is an annual home building blitz organized by Habitat for Humanity International and its affiliates. It generally takes place in the United States one year, and an international location the next.

press to zoom
Alton Sterling Protest
Alton Sterling Protest

The moment occurred on Saturday, July 9th, 2016, after the Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana ordered people protesting the death of Alton Sterling to clear the public roadway or risk being arrested. The woman in the frame, identified as a 28-year-old nurse named Ieshia Evans, decided to take a stand by stepping in the street and getting arrested. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

press to zoom
press to zoom
The Salt March
The Salt March

The Salt March was an act of nonviolent civil disobedience in colonial India initiated by Mohandas Gandhi to produce salt from the seawater in the coastal village of Dandi, as was the practice of the local populace until British officials introduced taxation on salt production, deemed their sea-salt reclamation activities illegal, and then repeatedly used force to stop it. The 24-day march was a direct action campaign of tax resistance and nonviolent protest against the British salt monopoly.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist, who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was the country's first black head of state and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid by tackling institutionalized racism and fostering racial reconciliation.

press to zoom
Alice Paul
Alice Paul

Alice Paul was an American suffragist, feminist, and women's rights activist, and one of the main leaders and strategists of the 1910s campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits sex discrimination in the right to vote. Along with Lucy Burns and others, Paul strategized events, such as the Woman Suffrage Procession and the Silent Sentinels, which were part of the successful campaign that resulted in its passage in 1920.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Boston Protest 2017
Boston Protest 2017

Thousands of counterdemonstrators marched Saturday in downtown Boston in a largely peaceful response to a self-described free speech rally. The march and rally came one week after racially motivated protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, turned deadly. "It's clear today that Boston stood for peace and love, not bigotry and hate," Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said.

press to zoom
#peacebyexample
#peacebyexample
press to zoom
Hurricane Harvey
Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey dropped 50in of rain and left 30,000 people homeless. Hundreds of people within their communities helped rescue those in need. Here, neighbors are using their personal boats to rescue flooded Friendswood residents, Aug. 27, 2017, in Friendswood, Texas. Photo Credit: Steve Gonzalez/Houston Chronicle

press to zoom
press to zoom
#peacebyexample
#peacebyexample
press to zoom
Haile Selassie I
Haile Selassie I

Haile Selassie I; 23 July 1892 – 27 August 1975, born Tafari Makonnen Woldemikael, was Ethiopia's regent from 1916 to 1930 and emperor from 1930 to 1974. He also served as Chairperson of the Organisation of African Unity from 25 May 1963 to 17 July 1964 and 5 November 1966 to 11 September 1967. He was a member of the Solomonic Dynasty.

press to zoom
Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, 1913 - 2005, was an activist in the Civil Rights Movement, whom the United States Congress called "the first lady of civil rights" and "the mother of the freedom movement". Sixty years ago, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Ala. Her courageous act is now American legend.

press to zoom
Dalai Lama
Dalai Lama

The Spiritual head of Tibetan Buddhism. His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a man of peace. In 1989 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his non-violent struggle for the liberation of Tibet. He has consistently advocated policies of non-violence, even in the face of extreme aggression. He also became the first Nobel Laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems

press to zoom
press to zoom
Colombia Peace March
Colombia Peace March

People gather at Bolivar's square during a peace march in Bogota, Colombia, Oct. 12, 2016. Thousands of rural farmers, indigenous activists and students marched in cities across Colombia to demand a peace deal between the government and leftist rebels.

press to zoom
Harvey Milk
Harvey Milk

Harvey Milk was an American politician and the first openly gay elected official in the history of California. Milk was not a one-issue politician. For him, gay issues were merely one part of an overall human rights vision. During his tragically short political career, Milk battled for a wide range of social changes in such areas as education, public transportation, child care. Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Covid 19 Nurses
Covid 19 Nurses

Risking their health and safety, doctors and nurses around the world are on the front lines of fighting Covid19. Image by Greg Gilbert of The Seattle Times.

press to zoom
Malala Yousafzai
Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. In afternoon of 9 October 2012, Yousafzai was injured after a Taliban gunman attempted to murder her. The murder attempt sparked a national and international outpouring of support for Yousafzai.

press to zoom
press to zoom
John Lennon/Yoko Ono
John Lennon/Yoko Ono

Former Beatle John Lennon, right, gestures as he speaks at a peace rally in New York’s Bryant Park on April 22, 1972. Standing beside him is his wife, Yoko Ono. The rally and march of some 30,000 persons in New York City is part of a nationwide day of protests and demonstrations against U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

press to zoom
Woodstock
Woodstock

Woodstock is arguably to this day the single most profound event in the history of music. Acts from all around the world met at Max Yasgur‘s Farm in Bethel, NY on August 15-18, 1969 for a celebration of peace and music. 400,000 youthful individuals gathered peacefully at Woodstock 1969 creating the largest gathering of human beings in one place in history. Woodstock 1969 defined an entire generation, its effects on music and American culture can still be felt today.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Mother Teresa
Mother Teresa

Born in 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia, Mother Teresa taught in India for 17 years before in 1946 she experienced her "call within a call" to devote herself to caring for the sick and poor. Her order established a hospice; centers for the blind, aged, and disabled; and a leper colony. In 1979 she received the Nobel Peace Prize for her humanitarian work. She died in September 1997 and was beatified in October 2003 and recognized as a Saint by the church in 2016.

press to zoom
I Am A Man Strike
I Am A Man Strike

On 1 February 1968, two Memphis garbage collectors, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, were crushed to death by a malfunctioning truck. Twelve days later, frustrated by the city’s response to the latest event in a long pattern of neglect and abuse of its black employees, 1,300 black men from the Memphis Department of Public Works went on strike.

press to zoom
Leymah Gbowee
Leymah Gbowee

Leymah Roberta Gbowee is a Liberian peace activist responsible for leading a women's peace movement, Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace that helped bring an end to the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003.

press to zoom
press to zoom
Vietnam War Protest
Vietnam War Protest

Titled: Flower Power. The picture was nominated for the 1967 Pulitzer Prize. Taken on October 21, 1967, during the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam's March on the Pentagon, the iconic photo shows a Vietnam War protestor placing a carnation into the barrel of a rifle held by a soldier of the 503rd Military Police Battalion. Photo Credit: Bernie Boston

press to zoom
Women of Iceland
Women of Iceland

On October 24, 1975, Icelandic women went on strike for the day to “demonstrate the indispensable work of women for Iceland’s economy and society” and to “protest wage discrepancy and unfair employment practices." 90% percent of Iceland’s female population did not go to their paid jobs and did not do any housework or child-rearing for the whole day. The next year, Parliament passed a law to guarantee equal pay. Five years later, Iceland elected the world's first female President.

press to zoom
press to zoom
#peacebyexample
#peacebyexample
press to zoom
press to zoom
1/1

Send me your stories/images of people and situations that have inspired you. 

This section is an all in one place for us to learn by the example of others. 

  • Facebook

more great examples here

 

Join me in spreading this universal message

 

                   

#PeaceByExample


This message is one that knows no boundaries of politics,

race, income level, religion, age, gender,

sexual orientation or nationality. 

 

Let us each ask ourselves, each and every day…


What example are we setting?

to ourselves? our family? our friends?

our community? our neighbors?

our co-workers? our employees?

our world? 

What choices are we making in our daily lives? 
Are we honoring and respecting
those around us?

Are we honoring and respecting ourselves? 
How are our choices affecting those around us? 
How are we communicating and
talking to each other?   

Are we choosing to talk respectfully? 

Are we listening respectfully?

Are we agreeing to disagree respectfully?
 

Are we being respectful and mindful of 

other's experiences and their well-being?  

          
Are we living our best possible example? 
          

I stand before you as someone who has made 

mistakes along the way, but I try to start each day by learning from those mistakes.

 

I try to begin each day with new eyes.
     

I care too much for humanity to allow negativity to infiltrate the core of my very being.  I want to try and live by positive example, each and every day, for the sake of our future, our society and our world. I want to start each day by doing my part, and with this campaign. 

       
The message is simple.

The message is positive.

The message starts with each of us.

                       

To be all that you are, and to find the courage to express it. 

 

To find the passion and confidence to bring whatever you have to the table, in whatever way defines you. 

 

We all have something to contribute, every single day, and in every possible way. We can positively affect one another,

If we will just listen. To ourselves, and to each other. 
                        
It's time to stop the madness that has
consumed us as a society.

I am asking for us all to be in the Here, in the Now.   

 

We all need to face ourselves and each other.
We all need to take responsibility.
We all need to come together.
We all need to reconcile our pasts and make change.

 

For each of us to do our part.

For each of us to be heard; 

to share and spread a simple, positive, universal message.

 

Help me to do something.

For I cannot live any other way, any longer.

Can you?

May our voice be Great and Collective.
With love, hope, compassion and a will for peace.

With Gratitude,

Julie Eppich   
                    

Here.Together.

use your mouse or fingers to control star.

Here.Together.

A Virtual Sculpture

This sculpture is meant to be a place where we can all be together as one....evolving and learning about each other.  Here.Together. is about sharing and representing a common message:  we are all in this together, we believe in each other, and we are stronger when unified under a theme of peace, love, acceptance and community.  Here.Together. is a place to learn about each other, and accept each other regardless of who we are and where we are from.

 

May we all LIVE IN LIGHT.

 

8.5 x 11 for your window, office, community locations

free.print.share

 

COMING SOON! 

 

Using the button below, you will be able to submit a photo, artwork/drawing, personal pendant and/or message.  These submissions will be received by me via email,

and will be added to the star as I receive them.  Each person will be able to navigate the star, zooming in and out...to learn about each other, how connected our world is, and for each of us to share a message, together.

Image must be jpeg and 150 dpi resolution.

 

 I am in need of someone who knows Blender and can help me upload multiple images to each face of the star.

Please send me an email to discuss.  

Upload Image Here
 

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

Success! Message received.

ABOUT ME

I believe in humankind.

CONTACT

Please contact me with any questions or comments you may have regarding this campaign.  I would love additional input about people and/or situations showing #peacebyexample that I can add to the education/image section of this website.  The image tile section is designed to be an all in one place to be inspired, and to educate. Pictures of people helping one another, other examples of leaders making positive change, or news articles (current/past), or someone who has inspired you or your community. We are ALL here to learn about each other.  I need your help.